Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Letter to the Editor
11 (
2
); 361-362
doi:
10.1055/s-0040-1709374

Healing Preferences among Tribal Patient with Mental Illness in India

Department of Social Work, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur, Tamil Nadu, India
Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha, India

Chittaranjan Subudhi Department of Social Work, Central University of Tamil Nadu Thiruvarur 610 005, Tamil Nadu India chittaranjan.subudhi@gmail.com chittaranjan@cutn.ac.inss

Licence
This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Belief is the best therapy for healing. In India, belief is highly associated with spiritual practices. Healing is a practice and process to get relieved from pain by preventing and putting an end to the deterioration of the human organs and restoration of the health.1 Every society has its own belief in the health care system for any kind of disease or illness, and belief includes the causation of illness, norms governing for choice and evolution of healing, socially legitimated statues, roles, power relationships, and so on.1 India consists of different kinds of healing methods (both traditional and modern) for mental illness and these methods are practiced in different ways depending on the culture. Due to this cultural ascendancy in India, traditional healers are the first and foremost choice among two-thirds of the patient with mental illness.2 3 4 Traditional healers have the upper hand in the healing process due to easy availability and proximity with community people. These traditional healers are predominant in most of the rural and tribal areas due to accessibility and cost-effectiveness when compared with other kinds of healing methods. Nearly about eight out of ten patients are resorting to religious places to get relief from the mental illness.2

A descriptive study had been undertaken to find out the healing preferences among tribal patients on the onset of mental illness. Data were collected from 50 tribal respondents who came for treatment in the Department of Psychiatry, Ispat General Hospital (IGH), Rourkela, Odisha, India. Purposive sampling method was adopted and an interview schedule was administered to collect data. The study found that more than one-fourth of the patients (36%) with mental illness consulted the traditional healers on the onset of mental illness. In this study, traditional healers include faith healers, religious healers, astrologers, temple healing, and local herbal healers, who follow the nonscientific way of healing practices. Results reveal that 28% of the respondents did not consult any healers on the commencement of mental illness. The hard truth is that nearly about two-third (64%)of the tribal patient with mental illness have not preferred or consulted the medical professionals at the onset of the illness.

Literature also reveals that traditional healing practices are widespread and foremost acceptability among all types of society and perceived supernatural etiology of mental illness compelled them to resort to traditional healers.3 5 Though the experience of traditional healing is mostly dissatisfied among the respondents, it still stands as a first-line preference among the respondents.6 To conclude, traditional healers and healing practices play a significant role in the healing process for treating mental illness among tribal patients in India.

Conflict of Interest

None declared.

Funding None.

References

  1. , . . Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture: An Exploration of the Borderland Between Anthropology, Medicine and Psychiatry. Berkeley: University of California Press
  2. , , , . Beliefs about mental illness: a study of a rural South-Indian community. Int J Ment Health. 1998;27(3):70-85.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. , . Resort to faith-healing practices in the pathway to care for mental illness: a study on psychiatric inpatients in Orissa. Ment Health Relig Cult. 2008;11(7):720-740.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , , . Experiences of religious healing in psychiatric patients in south India. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1997;32(4):215-221.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. , , , , . Help-seeking behavior of patients with mental health problems visiting a tertiary care center in north India. Indian J Psychiatry. 2011;53(3):234-238.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. , , , et al . Perceptions of traditional healing for mental illness in rural Gujarat. Ann Glob Health. 2014;80(2):96-102.
    [Google Scholar]

Fulltext Views
1,125

PDF downloads
123
View/Download PDF
Download Citations
BibTeX
RIS
Show Sections