Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Letters to the Editor
3 (
1
); 103-104
doi:
10.4103/0976-3147.91982

Single photon emission tomography as a predictor of outcome in vegetative state of head injury

Director, Institute of Clinical Neurobiology, Senior Editor Acta Neuropathologica, Kenyongasse, Vienna, Austria
Address for correspondence: Prof. Kurt A. Jellinger, Director, Institute of Clinical Neurobiology, Senior Editor Acta Neuropathologica, Kenyongasse 18; A-1070 Vienna, Austria. E-mail: kurt.jellinger@univie.ac.at
Licence

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Sir,

In a recent study, Nayak and Manepatra,[1] based on studies in 50 patients remaining in vegetative state (now referred to as “unresponsive wakefulness syndrome” (UWS)/2/),[2] stated that assessment of cerebral perfusion by single photon emission tomography (SPECT) is a better predictor of outcome than computerized tomography and/or magnetic resonance tomography. Already in 1972, SPECT measurement of total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with “apallic syndrome” following severe brain injury was shown to be an important tool for estimating the prognosis of these patients.[3] Correlation of CBF using SPECT and neuropathology in eight patients with vegetative state after brain injury revealed significant correlations between the decrease of CBF and the extent and pattern of brainstem damage, in particular with the degree of affection of the ascending activating reticular formation.[4] This association was later confirmed by positron emission tomography studies of CBF and glucose utilization in vegetative patients, involving, also, the cerebral cortex, basal nuclei and cerebellum.[5] However, there is still a need for prospective studies on the prognosis of the UWS in large, well-described cohorts of patients using standardized assessment and outcome scales.[2]

References

  1. , , . Single photon emission computed tomography scanning: A predictor of outcome in vegetative state of head injury. J Neurosci Rural Pract. 2011;2:12-6.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. , , , , , , . Unresponsive wakefulness syndrome: A new name for the vegetative state or apallid syndrome. BMC Med. 2010;8:68.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. , , , , . The prognostic value of cerebral blood flow measurement in patients with the apallic syndrome. J Neurol Sci. 1972;16:373-82.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , , . Crebral blood flow and brain stem lesion. J Neurol. 1972;203:197-209.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. , , , , , , . Differences in cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization in vegetative versus locked-in patients. Ann Neurol. 1982;22:673-82.
    [Google Scholar]

    Fulltext Views
    376

    PDF downloads
    225
    View/Download PDF
    Download Citations
    BibTeX
    RIS
    Show Sections