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Original Article
4 (
1
); 29-32
doi:
10.4103/0976-3147.105606

Elderly pedestrian neurotrauma: A descriptive study from a premier neurotrauma center in India

Departments of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Departments of Bio‑stastitics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Address for correspondence: Dr. Nupur Pruthi Department of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences Hosur Road, Bangalore, Karnataka India pruthi_nupur@yahoo.co.in
Licence
This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Thieme Medical and Scientific Publishers Private Ltd. and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Context: Experience with elderly pedestrian neurotrauma at a major neurotrauma tertiary center. Aims: To highlight the specific injuries and outcome of the elderly pedestrian neurotrauma patients within the city of Bangalore and its surrounding districts. Settings and Design: A retrospective study consisting of demographic data, clinical findings, radiological details, and outcomes. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted at the casualty services, in which 143 consecutive elderly pedestrian (age >60 years) head injury victims were studied from June to September 2009. The records from the hospital mortuary were analyzed from 2007 to 2009. An analysis of 77 elderly patients who died as a pedestrian in accidents during this period was performed. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 15. Results: The elderly pedestrians constituted 27% (143/529) of all pedestrian traumas. Two wheelers were the most common accident vehicle (56.6%, 81/143). Most of the injuries (38.5%, 55/143) occurred during peak traffic hours, that is, 4 pm to 9 pm. Majority sustained moderate to severe head injury (61%, 87/143). More than three‑fourths of patients required a computed tomography (CT) scan (77%, 110/143), in which there was a higher frequency of contusion (31.5%, 45/143), and subdural hemorrhage (23.1%, 33/143). Most of the injured (43.3%, 13/30) underwent surgery for intracranial hematoma. The mortality rate was 22.8% (8/35). Nearly one‑fourth of conducted postmortems among pedestrians belonged to the elderly age group (77/326, 23.6%). Conclusions: Elderly pedestrian neurotrauma patients sustain a more severe injury as evident by poorer Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) scores and CT scan findings, and hence have a higher mortality rate.

Keywords

Bangalore
elderly pedestrian
neurotrauma

Conflicts of interest

None declared

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