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Commentary
6 (
3
); 448-448

Commentary

Address for correspondence: Dr. Ulf Jensen-Kondering, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, University of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 3, Haus 41, Germany. E-mail: Ulf.Jensen-Kondering@uksh.de

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This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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This article was originally published by Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher; therefore Scientific Scholar has no control over the quality or content of this article.

Imaging of stroke is in large part pattern recognition. Distribution, location and appearance can give insight into etiology (hemodynamic, microangiopathic, embolic), origin (vascular territory) and age (ischemic early signs, fogging, demarcation) of an insult. Furthermore, non-enhanced CT or conventional MRI can provide information on clot burden[1] and vessel status[2] even if advanced imaging techniques such as perfusion and vessel imaging are not available.

Eswaradas et al. present a rare case of bilateral and symmetrical cerebellar infarction to the posterior inferior cerebellar arteries leaving a typical pattern resembling an inverted V or rabbit ears.[3] Although the etiology could not be elucidated, appreciation of the so-called “small” strokes in the cerebellum is important as coma and death may result, as the authors note.

Knowledge of characteristic stroke patterns or, as in this case, anatomic variants[4] can narrow down the differential diagnosis and entail rapid and economic use of further diagnostic tests.

References

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  2. , , , , . The subpetrous carotid wall hematoma: A sign of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery on non-enhanced computed tomography - a retrospective study. Rofo. 2015;187:168-72.
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  3. , , , , . Inverted V or rabbit ear sign in cerebellum. J Neurosci Rural Pract. 2015;6:447-8.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , , , , , , . Acute bilateral cerebellar infarcts in the territory of posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Neurology. 2000;55:582-4.
    [Google Scholar]

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