Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Search in posts
Search in pages
Filter by Categories
Book Review
Brief Report
Case Letter
Case Report
Case Series
Commentary
Current Issue
Editorial
Erratum
Guest Editorial
Images
Images in Neurology
Images in Neuroscience
Images in Neurosciences
Letter to Editor
Letter to the Editor
Letters to Editor
Letters to the Editor
Media and News
None
Notice of Retraction
Obituary
Original Article
Point of View
Position Paper
Review Article
Short Communication
Systematic Review
Systematic Review Article
Technical Note
Techniques in Neurosurgery
View/Download PDF

Translate this page into:

Commentary
3 (
2
); 151-151

Commentary

Faculdade de Medicina Dentária da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Address for correspondence: Dr. Henrique Luís, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal. E-mail: henrique.luis@fmd.ul.pt

Read COMMENTARY-ARTICLE associated with this -

Licence

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Disclaimer:
This article was originally published by Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd and was migrated to Scientific Scholar after the change of Publisher.

The use of fluoridated drinking water is an effective measure to prevent dental caries. This procedure, in use since the 2nd half of the 20th century is, along with the use of fluoridated dentifrices, a major factor responsible for the decline of dental disease, becoming the most cost-effective measure to prevent dental caries.[1] Depending on climate and geographic region, a fluoride concentration of 0.7 ppm - 1.2 ppm is recommended for drinkable water.

The primary preventive mechanism of fluoridated water is topical, after tooth eruption, for both adults and children. Such mechanism includes the inhibition of demineralization, an enhancement of remineralization and the inhibition of bacterial activity in dental plaque.[2] Some communities with natural fluoridated water may have a higher concentration of fluoride, with systemic risks for the population. Among these risks, dental fluorosis is probably the most common.

There are described in the literature several other risks, especially if fluoride exists along with a high concentration of arsenic,[34] or by itself in high dosage.[5] Most of the reported cases occur in China, India, Mexico and Bangladesh.

The article “Effect of fluoride exposure on intelligence of school children in Madhya Pradesh, India” presents an effort to address the issue of the effect of fluoride exposure on children intelligence, considering a wide approach to the analysis of this theme. Multiple interactions and social aspects were observed, namely personal characteristics and residential history, medical background and nutritional status. Also, an evaluation of water fluoride content, urine content of fluoride, lead and arsenic and urinary iodine, as well as the assessment of intelligence, contributes to the comprehensive study of the individual and the effects of these parameters on the intelligence of school children. This approach is a good example of the need to make a holistic evaluation of health risk factors since it is accepted in the scientific community, that most of the problems are multifactorial. The study presented on this article positively contributes to the discussion on the effect of high fluoride content in drinking water on intelligence of school children.[6]

References

  1. From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Achievements in public health, 1900-1999: fluoridation of drinking water to prevent dental caries. JAMA. 2000;283:1283-6.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. , . Prevention and reversal of dental caries: Role of low level fluoride. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1999;27:31-40.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. , , , , , , . Arsenic and fluoride exposure in drinking water: Children's IQ and growth in Shanyin county, Shanxi province, China. Environ Health Perspect. 2007;115:643-7.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. , , , , , . Decreased intelligence in children and exposure to fluoride and arsenic in drinking water. Cadernos de Saúde Pública. 2007;23(Suppl 4):S579-87.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. , , , , , . Fluoride and Children's Intelligence: A Meta-analysis. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2008;126:115-20.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. , , , . Effect of fluoride exposure on intelligence of school children in Madhya Pradesh, India. J Neurosci Rural Pract. 2012;3:144-9.
    [Google Scholar]

    Fulltext Views
    1,423

    PDF downloads
    290
    View/Download PDF
    Download Citations
    BibTeX
    RIS
    Show Sections